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Chicken soup for the prisoner's soul : 101 stories to open the heart and rekindle the spirit of hope, healing and forgiveness /

by Canfield, Jack; Hansen, Mark Victor; Lagana, Tom.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Deerfield Beach, Fla. : Health Communications, c2000Description: xxxv, 347 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 1558748369 (pbk. : trade paper) :; 1558748377; 9781558748378; 9781558748361 (pbk. : trade paper).Title notes: $14.95 5-2012 (db)Subject(s): Prisoners -- Conduct of life | Prisoners -- Education | Moral education | Spiritual life | Short storiesOnline resources: Sample text | Publisher description | Contributor biographical information Summary: Presents a collection of stories about prisoners who have turned their lives around to become productive members of society.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult NonFiction 158.2 CHI Available 39270003651654

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>Previously available only through free distribution to prisons, this life-changing book is the result of charitable donations from sales of Chicken Soup for the Christian Family Soul and gifts from thousands of individuals.</p> <p>In the spring of 2000, over 100,000 copies of Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul were distributed to prisoners, prison libraries and prison ministries throughout the United States. The hope was that this collection of stories would touch the hearts of prisoners and offer them hope and encouragement, as well as inspire them to transcend the limiting thinking and behaviors of their past.</p> <p>The book was so successful that the co-authors soon found themselves flooded with requests for the book from family members, correctional officers, prison volunteers and others. Because of this huge demand, the decision was made to also release the book to the general public.</p>

$14.95 5-2012 (db)

Presents a collection of stories about prisoners who have turned their lives around to become productive members of society.

Bibliography : p. 341-345.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">The Sunray Catcher Today, in the prison chow hall, I overheard a young female officer talking to another officer. She was talking about her special little girl. Seems this little girl was standing on the front seat of her car the other day, grabbing at the sunrays as they reflected off the windshield. When her mother asked her what she was doing, the little girl said she was trying to catch a sunray for her mom as a present. Both officers agreed on how special moments like that were. The other officer then asked if this mother got to spend time with her special little girl. No, but when my career gets back on track, I'll have more time to spend with her, when she is older, said the young mother. I wanted to scream and tell her that mother to spend every single second she possibly can with her child, but I couldn't. Maybe after you read what follows, you will better understand. It's the awful truth, as it happened to me. It starts with an unwritten letter -- a letter I can never send: Dear Kent, As I look at you, I see your hair is nicely combed. I remember the hours and gallons of water we used, trying to train your hair. It always seemed to have a mind of its own. I can see that scar on your lip; hardly shows now, too. We were worried about that. You were such a brave little man when I took you to Dr. Nordquist to get those three stitches in it. I was the one who almost fainted when they started sticking you with that needle. The nurse even made me leave the room. On the way home, I told you that you could have any treat you wanted, for being so brave. You wanted a cup of coffee, Like big men drink, you said. My five-year-old little brave man, drinking coffee in the Rainbow Restaurant, just like big men. It was our secret; lucky Mom never found out, huh? You have grown tall and nice looking. Grandpa always said you were going to be a big man. Guess what I'm proudest of in you? It's your kindness to all things. When we found out that your little dog, Porkchop, was epileptic, you were so happy that you cried. You had seen Porkchop have fits many times, and we were sure he would die. For three years after that, you faithfully gave Porkchop his pill every day. I remember the day you helped me fix my pickup. We sure got greasy -- Mom wouldn't even let us in the house for lunch, but we fooled her. We went to the store and got a pizza, then lipped off to Mom and your two brothers, while eating it, still dirty. Yes, that was fun. We laughed a lot that day. I found out later that you did save a piece of pizza for your little brother; it was our secret too. I've always been proud of you for so many reasons, Kent. Your silent kindness and strength, your loyalty, your soft heart, and secrets you shared with me. I remember how you used to lay across my lap with your shirt pulled up, exposing your bare back. I would trace my fingers lightly over your skin; it seemed to almost hypnotize you. I had done it many times when you were a baby, t Excerpted from Chicken Soup for the Prisoner's Soul: 101 Stories to Open the Heart and Rekindle the Spirit of Hope, Healing and Forgiveness by Jack L. Canfield, Mark Victor Hansen, Tom Lagana All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

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