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Healing the shame that binds you /

by Bradshaw, John.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Recovery classics.Publisher: Deerfield Beach, Fla. : Health Communications, c2005Edition: Expanded and updated ed.Description: xix, 315 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0757303234 :; 9780757303234.Title notes: $14.95 prolam 3-2012 (db)Subject(s): Shame | Psychotherapy | Psychotherapy | Shame
Contents:
The problem-spiritual bankruptcy -- Introduction: shame as demonic (The internalization process) -- The healthy faces of shame (HDL shame) -- The toxically destructive faces of shame (LDL shame) -- The major sources of toxic shame -- The hiding places of toxic shame -- The solution--the recovery and uncovery process -- A parable: The prisoner in the dark cave -- Introduction: the externalization process -- Coming out of hiding and isolation -- Twelve steps for transforming toxic shame into healthy shame -- Liberating your wounded inner child and redoing toxic shame scenes -- Integrating your disowned parts -- Confronting and changing your toxic inner voices -- Choosing to love and forgive yourself for your mistakes -- Dealing with toxic shame in relationships -- Spiritual awakening--the discovery process -- Introduction: Healthy shame as the source and guardian of spirituality -- Spirituality and sexuality -- Shame as revelatory and revolutionary: discovering your spiritual destiny -- Seven major spiritual blessings that come from developing healthy shame.
Summary: This recovery edition is completely updated and expanded by the author, including follow-up on past studies, today's most cutting edge information, answers to the questions that have come up time and again since this book was first published twenty years ago and new chapters on the intersection between spirituality and emotional healing.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult NonFiction 616.8522 BRA 2005 Missing 39270003361965

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This classic book, written 17 years ago but still selling more than 13, 000 copies every year, has been completely updated and expanded by the author. I used to drink, writes John Bradshaw, to solve the problems caused by drinking. The more I drank to relieve my shame-based loneliness and hurt, the more I felt ashamed. Shame is the motivator behind our toxic behaviors: the compulsion, co-dependency, addiction and drive to superachieve that breaks down the family and destroys personal lives. This book has helped millions identify their personal shame, understand the underlying reasons for it, address these root causes and release themselves from the shame that binds them to their past failures.

$14.95 prolam 3-2012 (db)

Includes bibliographical references (p. 311-315).

The problem-spiritual bankruptcy -- Introduction: shame as demonic (The internalization process) -- The healthy faces of shame (HDL shame) -- The toxically destructive faces of shame (LDL shame) -- The major sources of toxic shame -- The hiding places of toxic shame -- The solution--the recovery and uncovery process -- A parable: The prisoner in the dark cave -- Introduction: the externalization process -- Coming out of hiding and isolation -- Twelve steps for transforming toxic shame into healthy shame -- Liberating your wounded inner child and redoing toxic shame scenes -- Integrating your disowned parts -- Confronting and changing your toxic inner voices -- Choosing to love and forgive yourself for your mistakes -- Dealing with toxic shame in relationships -- Spiritual awakening--the discovery process -- Introduction: Healthy shame as the source and guardian of spirituality -- Spirituality and sexuality -- Shame as revelatory and revolutionary: discovering your spiritual destiny -- Seven major spiritual blessings that come from developing healthy shame.

This recovery edition is completely updated and expanded by the author, including follow-up on past studies, today's most cutting edge information, answers to the questions that have come up time and again since this book was first published twenty years ago and new chapters on the intersection between spirituality and emotional healing.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Acknowledgments (p. vii)
  • Preface to the Revised Edition (p. ix)
  • Preface to the Original Edition (p. xv)
  • Part I The Problem-Spiritual Bankruptcy
  • Introduction: Shame as Demonic (The Internalization Process) (p. 2)
  • 1 The Healthy Faces of Shame (HDL Shame) (p. 5)
  • 2 The Toxically Destructive Faces of Shame (LDL Shame) (p. 21)
  • 3 The Major Sources of Toxic Shame (p. 45)
  • 4 The Hiding Places of Toxic Shame (p. 101)
  • Part II The Solution-The Recovery and Uncovery Process A Parable: The Prisoner in the Dark Cave (p. 150)
  • Introduction: The Externalization Process (p. 151)
  • 5 Coming Out of Hiding and Isolation (p. 153)
  • 6 Twelve Steps for Transforming Toxic Shame into Healthy Shame (p. 159)
  • 7 Liberating Your Wounded Inner Child and Redoing Toxic Shame Scenes (p. 167)
  • 8 Integrating Your Disowned Parts (p. 188)
  • 9 Confronting and Changing Your Toxic Inner Voices (p. 199)
  • 10 Choosing to Love and Forgive Yourself for Your Mistakes (p. 223)
  • 11 Dealing with Toxic Shame in Relationships (p. 235)
  • Part III Spiritual Awakening-The Discovery Process
  • Introduction: Healthy Shame as the Source and Guardian of Spirituality (p. 252)
  • 12 Spirituality and Sexuality (p. 255)
  • 13 Shame as Revelatory and Revolutionary: Discovering Your Spiritual Destiny (p. 275)
  • 14 Seven Major Spiritual Blessings That Come from Developing Healthy Shame (p. 283)
  • Epilogue (p. 309)
  • Sources (p. 311)

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">PART I The Problem Spiritual Bankruptcy We have no imagination for Evil, but Evil has us in its grip. C. G. JungIntroduction: Shame as Demonic (The Internalization Process) As I've delved deeper into the destructive power of toxic shame, I've come to see that it directly touches the age-old theological and metaphysical discussion generally referred to as the problem of evil. The problem of evil may be more accurately described as the mystery of evil. No one has ever explained the existence of evil in the world. Centuries ago in the Judeo-Christian West, evil was considered the domain of the Devil, or Satan, the fallen angel. Biblical scholars tell us that the idea of a purely evil being like the Devil or Satan was a late development in the Bible. In the book of Job, Satan was the heavenly district attorney whose job it was to test the faith of those who, like Job, were specially blessed. During the Persian conquest of the Israelites, the Satan of Job became fused with the Zoroastrian dualistic theology adopted by the Persians, where two opposing forces, one of good, Ahura Mazda, the Supreme Creator deity, was in a constant battle with Ahriman, the absolute god of evil. This polarized dualism was present in the theology of the Essenes and took hold in Christianity where God and his Son Jesus were in constant battle with the highest fallen angel, Satan, for human souls. This dualism persists today only in fundamentalist religions (Muslim terrorists, the Taliban, the extreme Christian Right and a major part of evangelical Christianity). The figure of Satan and the fires of hell have been demythologized by modern Christian biblical scholars, theologians and philosophers. The mystery of evil has not been dismissed by the demythologizing of the Devil. Rather, it has been intensified in the twentieth century by two world wars, Nazism, Stalinism, the genocidal regime of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia, and the heinous and ruthless extermination of Tibetans and Tibetan Buddhism by Pol Pot. These reigns of evil form what has been called a collective shadow, and it has been shown how naïve and unconscious the people of the world have been in relation to these evils. The denial of evil seems to be a learned behavior. The idea of evil is always subject to denial as a coping mechanism. Evil is real and is a permanent part of the human condition. 'To deny that evil is a permanent affliction of humankind,' says the philosopher Ernst Becker in his book Escape from Evil, 'is perhaps the most dangerous kind of thinking.' He goes on to suggest that in denying evil, humans have heaped evil on the world. Historically, great misfortunes have resulted from humans, blinded by the full reality of evil, thinking they were doing good but dispensing miseries far worse than the evil they thought to eradicate. The Crusades during the Middle Ages and the Vietnam War are examples that come to mind. While demons, Satan and hellfire have been demytholo Excerpted from Healing the Shame That Binds You by John Bradshaw All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

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