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The vigorous mind : cross-train your brain to break through mental, emotional, and professional boundaries /

by Cummings, Ingrid E.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Deerfield Beach, Fla. : Health Communications, c2009Description: x, 326 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0757306985 (trade paper) :; 9780757306983 (trade paper).Title notes: $14.95 prolam 1-2011 (db)Subject(s): Self-actualization (Psychology) | Mind and body | Mind-Body Relations (Metaphysics) | Self Concept
Contents:
How to use this book, and how I came to write it -- Bridging the fulfillment gap -- Using Kaizen to triumph in twenty -- Imperative #1 : the curiosity imperative : don't take "yes" for an answer -- Imperative #2 : the individuality imperative : to thine own self be true, or not -- Imperative #3 : the selectivity imperative : be selective but open-minded, there is enough time -- Imperative #4 : the empathy imperative : share the riches -- Imperative #5 : the stretch imperative : put something on the line -- Imperative #6 : the spirituality imperative : peak experiences and constructing a worldview -- Imperative #7 : the courage imperative : the audacity to be an amateur -- The beauty of being an autodidact -- Systems thinking : thriving as a generalist in the workplace -- The omnibus omni.
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Item type Home library Collection Shelving location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Books Books Altadena Main Library
Adult Collection Adult NonFiction 158.1 CUM Available 39270003446048

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>Learn how to 'Cross-Train Your Brain.' Here's why:</p> <p>To make the most of your precious leisure time. The Vigorous Mind will address that most fundamental of questions: How Shall I Spend My Time? Overwhelmed by the turbocharged pace of modern life, we let too much of our brainpower lie dormant. Could leisure represent an opportunity for something more substantial, such as personal growth and development? </p> <p>To move past the rut of over-specialization. Society has gone too far in the direction of simplicity and over-specialization. The dawning trend is beginning to emerge: A corrective move back to glorifying generalists ('Renaissance people') as the big-picture, intersectional thinkers we are. Let's diversify our brain's portfolio!</p> <p>To put a stop to 'mental malnutrition,' or 'the blahs.' Many of us are listless, depressed, or anxious but aren't sure why or what to do about it. Hint: Neuroscience shows that the brain needs a well-rounded array of pursuits to stay intellectually sharp and emotionally healthy, as well as to resist the ravages of Alzheimer's and dementia. </p> <p>To achieve greater professional success and overall life gratification. Building a more vigorous mind will tremendously enhance your engagement with the world. </p> <p>But is it possible to be a 'Renaissance person' in our modern era? In The Vigorous Mind, you will discover that the ancient eastern philosophy known as kaizen makes it achievable, if you devote as little as 20 minutes a day to cross-training your brain. </p> <p>In The Vigorous Mind, professional 'Renaissance woman' Ingrid Cummings offers a social criticism and inspiring self-improvement program that details the antidote to mental undernourishment, unfulfilling careers, untapped talents, and unexplained boredom. Through the techniques and insights in The Vigorous Mind, you will build a more complex, interconnected brain and replace indifference with cognitive reengagement, a sense of optimistic gratification, and a full-to-the-brim life lived without regret. </p>

$14.95 prolam 1-2011 (db)

How to use this book, and how I came to write it -- Bridging the fulfillment gap -- Using Kaizen to triumph in twenty -- Imperative #1 : the curiosity imperative : don't take "yes" for an answer -- Imperative #2 : the individuality imperative : to thine own self be true, or not -- Imperative #3 : the selectivity imperative : be selective but open-minded, there is enough time -- Imperative #4 : the empathy imperative : share the riches -- Imperative #5 : the stretch imperative : put something on the line -- Imperative #6 : the spirituality imperative : peak experiences and constructing a worldview -- Imperative #7 : the courage imperative : the audacity to be an amateur -- The beauty of being an autodidact -- Systems thinking : thriving as a generalist in the workplace -- The omnibus omni.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

<opt> <anon I1="BLANK" I2="BLANK">How to Use This Book,and How I Came to Write It Life itself is the proper binge. Julia Child (1912 2004), chefThe Proper Binge Doesn't it make sense that we should all feel pretty good about ourselves?After all, we've acquired so much of what we've always desired: spouses, kids, careers, friends, homes, cars, education, electronics, shoes galore, and microwave ovens with innards that twirl around and around. It's scary almost, how well we're doing, even when you factor in economic frazzles and the volatility in so many sectors of our lives. So of course, things aren't exactly perfect, but we never counted on perfect. We did somehow expect, though, that we'd feel a little better about things. Instead, around midlife (your mileage may vary), almost without fail, burnout sets in. Maybe severely, maybe mildly. The blahs. Stagnation. Just at the point in life when we should feel proud and accomplished and something approaching happy, we begin to feel . . . flat. There's no mystery why the haunting song 'Is That All There Is?' was a hit. It oozed ennui, that corrosive disillusionment so many adults experience. We feel it, most of us, but we try to deny it. And our culture offers up lots of ways to tamp it down, things that are quite contrary to Julia Child's proper binge noted above. 'Improper binges' could include drink, drug, demon chocolate, antidepressants, shopping for more shoes, or buying microwaves that are even fancier in their ability to spin the food around yet still leave cold spots in it. No, the problem isn't that things aren't perfect. The problem is that we've lost our ability to be seduced by the world. Children are enthralled by everything, because it's all new. As adults, though, we believe we've been there, been everywhere; done that, done everything; bought the T-shirt, bought the iPod. We've become blasé. We've started to flatline. And we don't know how to fix it.Is it any wonder so many of us experience burnout and low-grade depression in midlife? Sit up, because this is the big reveal: we are starved for mental stimulation. A core belief of mine is that we all simply want to feel better about ourselves. Becoming just a little smarter, a little more well-rounded, a little more engaged with the underappreciated treasures of this wide, wide world that will do the trick very nicely, thank you. Yet, for the most part, we deride ourselves, noting our failings, our shortcomings, our underachieving smallness. But it's absolutely possible to feel better about ourselves without resorting to antidepressants or antianxiety medications. Just as the world offers up plenty to be disheartened about, so does it offer up all the raw materials to cross-train our brains.What does it mean to 'cross-train' your brain? At the most basic level, it means to make a point of exercising all of your brain, not just the comparatively small part you take out for a spin every day in your job as a chemist, organic farmer, or automotive des Excerpted from Vigorous Mind: Cross-Train Your Brain to Break Through Mental, Emotional, and Professional Boundaries by Ingrid E. Cummings All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.</anon> </opt>

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